Why Are So Many Art Collectors Hungry For Pictures of Cakes?

  When collectors are seeking to purchase high quality, original works on paper, we are delighted to find that they often locate Komarin Cakes. Issues of content meet formal concerns. Collectors of Komarin Cakes are drawn to both the subject, i.e. cakes, and the way that those cakes are painted. Form and Content are always on the tightrope. How something is painted is as important as what that something is. In recent months, several of my dealers were contacted by individuals who had specific and quite personal motivations to purchase Cake paintings. One circumstance dealt with the celebration of wedded bliss. Several weeks later, another individual contacted one of my gallerists seeking a Cake to honor the loss of a loved one. We were — needless to say — touched by both requests. I began to paint Cakes and Stacked Cakes in the mid ‘90s in New York when I was first invited to show with Jean Michel Basquiat and Philip Guston. The Cakes were unplanned, as is the case with all my work, and happily arrived in my studio without  an appointment one spring morning in 1995. The pictures of cakes are a marriage of sorts between the domestic and the architectural. My father was an architect who trained in Prague and my mother a writer from Vienna who baked many cakes when we were growing up. Her baking skills were less about technique and perfection of form  and more about love and a certain deliciousness that was itself largely unplanned. Cakes are most often celebratory throughout world cultures East and West. Birthday and weddings come to mind...

Painting and Drawing in Contemporary Abstraction

The issue of when one draws or paints in contemporary abstraction is not a fixed matter. In the Renaissance and pre-Renaissance, an artist would typically do a series of drawings and studies to prepare for a larger, more finished painting. Drawing was preparatory and rarely valued in and of itself as a finished and complete work. A painting would begin with a drawing. Then, various thin layers of paint and glazes would be applied as gradually the drawing would disappear beneath the painted surface. Drawing created the armature and was not meant to be seen. In Contemporary Abstraction, these matters changed considerably. Picasso opened the door to a very alive interaction between drawing and painting. Painting and drawing moved back and forth and there was a free exchange of energy between both. Picasso would draw with charcoal and pencil or crayon, for example, but he would also draw with the brush. For me, there is very lively and desirable interaction between drawing and painting. I begin a painting by making a series of random marks in the white canvas.  These marks are sometimes made with my eyes closed, and at other times, something I might see out the window of my studio or some series of forms I have drawn before inspire me. At other times, I  will begin a painting by scribbling a series of words across the canvas, perhaps upside down and sideways all at the same time. When a painting is started and the paint is sloshed and brushed and dripped and scraped across the surface of the canvas, some of the drawing will be visible,...