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The Drawing Pushes the Painting and the Painting Pushes Back

 

The marriage of drawing and painting in Komarin’s work is quite open and free flowing. He feels liberated by the free association that occurs with crayon drawing. The artist draws and paints, back and forth, embracing those qualities that paint or crayon or charcoal contain. It is evident that the painter uses drawing to open up the space of a painting when things go flat or the surface becomes inert.

The space between ‘things’ in his paintings is as important as the forms themselves. Barry Schwabsky, a former New York Times art critic, wrote for the Catalog Exhibition for Dubai, “A painting proceeds by steps from wonderful to less than wonderful and back to wonderful in a matter of seconds. The term that painters often use is that a Painting is working or not working. Mark making with crayon or pencil or charcoal can set the painting in a different direction. One, however, does not want to ‘direct’ too much.”

Dirty White Tapping Reeve 78 x 70″ 2012

In Komarin’s words, “Like the Dada-ist painters, I will close my eyes, draw ‘something,’ draw anything… and then allow the hand to lead me where the painting needs to go. The drawing may look like something or it may not look like something but the energy of the mark making is apparent and keeps the ‘soup’ of the Painting very much alive. The drawing pushes the painting and the painting pushes back. This is a good place to be. This is the best place to be.”

Where does Gary Komarin find ideas for his work nowadays? Like every artist with a keen eye, he observes everything from a jerry-rigged door in an elevator stairwell to a passing stranger in an Italian café.

“Like the Dada-ist painters, I will close my eyes, draw ‘something,’ draw anything and then allow the hand to lead me where the painting needs to go.”

Gary Komarin