Life, Love and Riding the Wave: A Sun Valley Komarin Art Show

Life, Love and Riding the Wave: A Sun Valley Komarin Art Show

Life takes many curious twists and turns. Generally speaking, life moves in a wave, as does sound, light, and the oceans that cover our planet – whether you are in St. Bart’s, Jones Beach or the far reaches of some distant island. It happens that light can travel through space in a complete vacuum, whereas sound needs some form of matter to travel. As I have a current exhibition of new paintings at Gail Severn Gallery in Sun Valley, Idaho, KK and I were fully prepared and packed and ready to go fly west. Upon arriving at La Guardia Airport (at the ungodly hour of 6 am) we were told by the sleep deprived flight attendant that “all flights were canceled.” Period. End of subject. We returned to our NYC pied a terre, at first a bit out of sorts, had a glass of champagne and decided, as they say, “to make the best of it”. Or similarly, we made lemonade out of lemons. We had attempted to ride the wave and fly west and, on this morning, there was no wave to ride. Life is very much like riding a wave, and it does one good to remember this. Things often go well until they don’t. Much of this is, it seems, beyond our control. It is a good thing to realize that things happen that will position you, for a while only, in a downward wave; if one breathes adequately and stays calm, they will be picked up by an upward moving wave. So KK and I hung out, as it were, saw several movies – including...
Wabi Sabi: Impermanence, Art, and a Journey to Japan

Wabi Sabi: Impermanence, Art, and a Journey to Japan

I have long been intrigued by the Japanese concept of wabi sabi, the roots of which can be found in Zen Buddhism. Intrigued longer, it seems, than I have had a name for the idea. This changed shortly after I journeyed through Japan alongside my Japanese art Collector. Wabi sabi is a philosophy that deals with transience, imperfection and the incompleteness of objects that man makes and has been making for all time. Followers of wabi sabi believe that: Nothing lasts Nothing is finished Nothing is perfect I traveled to Japan on two occasions, once in 2007 and once in 2008. One of my Japanese Collectors is a prolific collector of antiquities from around the world. He saw my work at a solo exhibition in London, during the spring of 2006, and purchased a great many of my paintings that year. Soon after, he invited me to Japan to travel with him throughout his country. We journeyed east and west, north and south visiting many museums, fish markets, galleries, and teashops. While traveling with my Japanese Collector, who is well known throughout Japan, I experienced the country in a way very different than many others. At many stops along our winding route we would be served tea in the most wonderfully delicate manner. Amidst a good deal of polite bowing, the tea was always brought out in a beautiful clay pot and small teacups. My eye was drawn to how often the cups might be a bit misshapen or have slight cracks running across the surface. I puzzled over the somewhat irregular glaze. It was not until a friend...

What Is Your Inspiration? I Can Hear The Wilderness Listen

A Painter not only looks at the world but also they must listen to what it is telling them. Whether one is a landscape painter, a minimalist, a painterly abstractionist or a fully conceptual installation artist, one not only must pay attention to the world around him but also one must listen to what the world is saying. When using the term listen, I am referring to looking as much as listening. Looking and listening lay very close together on the observational bandwidth. Listen up, and you will discover your inspiration A Painter observes the world around him, often taking in information on a subconscious level as much if not more than on the conscious level.  By this I mean that a Painter, a Poet, a Novelist, a Singer, and an Actor are soaking in information all the time, whether that information is about spatial relations in landscape, about the beat of the rain on a metal roof, the sound of a chair being pulled across a bare stage, or the curious and unexpected expression of a child pondering a shell on the beach. These accumulated observations, building over minutes, days, weeks, months, and years become the source materials for a great deal of creative work that a Painter may do once they declare their intentions to be an artist and begin to do the work that an artist does. A Painter and an Actor, for example, have similar tendencies to watch people and things, in motion or stillness, to listen for the familiar and unfamiliar, to gather these many observations together and to knit them into the substructure...