Art Historical Resonance and Komarin Exhibition in The Hamptons

Art Historical Resonance and Komarin Exhibition in The Hamptons

As an abstract painter painting in 2015, it is a very curiously emotional experience to show my new paintings in Bridgehampton, New York. Many do not realize that some of the greatest American Painters of the past century settled in The Hamptons in the late 40’s and 50’s, having moved out of the barren, cold, and gritty loft spaces of lower New York. Two of the most famous of these individuals were Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. While Willem de Kooning had emigrated from Holland to New York, and Jackson Pollock from Wyoming to New York, both had lived and worked in the lower reaches of Manhattan. Life for an abstract painter in the 30’s and 40’s was a very tough experience indeed. Painters tended to live in cold water flats – toilets and sinks down the hall – and very little money coming up the pipeline. The mindset and expectation of making money was very, very low. There was no place to go, so why not pour everything into the ‘work.’ Painters at this time were drawn to painting like moths to a flame. It was not the career that well-positioned parents and teachers encouraged their talented children to pursue. Picasso was the God that was worshipped from across the big and tumbling ocean…and both Pollock and de Kooning struggled to keep alive, make the rent and still paint their hearts out during the daylight hours. Both were heavy drinkers and smokers, but this came very much with the territory. It wasn’t so much an attempt to be ‘romantic,’ the act of painting. Rather, these individuals were hard-core devoted artists and the drinking and smoking...
The Poet and the Painter Swim in the Same Sea

The Poet and the Painter Swim in the Same Sea

There are strong affinities between the Poet and Painter. The Poet often speaks with an oblique voice as does the Painter. Neither is looking for one simple answer to the equation of life. A poem most often has a certain musicality that embraces and works through and around the content of the poem. Poems and songs were first sung or spoken aloud before the written language came along. Similarly a painting, whether Abstract or Figurative or somewhere in between, has its own musicality. One has to get very quiet to hear it. Whether a later Mondrian or a landscape by Turner, a cave painting of a bison or a Minimalist strip painting by Barnett Newman, there is a strong poetic component to all. Things are not meant to mean only one thing. The reader or listener is encouraged to figure it out. A poem may not mean the same thing to each individual any more than a painting is meant to mean one thing to the viewer, whether that viewer be a collector or simply one who appreciates the painting. The connections between poet and painter have been noted before, particularly insofar as one often inspires the other. Can it be so? How one viewer perceived my painting Years ago I did a large Dirty White painting that had a series of oblique forms that moved through the space of the painting. One morning I got a call from a dealer in Houston. He said he had a collector on the hook ready to purchase the piece but there was one problem: they didn’t like the painting of the pig in the...